Surveys in Ukraine

ESJF 2019/20 surveys in five European countries

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Site name:

Baryshivka Jewish Cemetery

Perimeter map:

Baryshivka Jewish Cemetery map

The cemetery was demolished in the 1960s and 1970s, and buildings were constructed on the site. According to local residents, tombstones and other materials were removed and used for construction purposes. Immediately after the demolition of the cemetery, a butchery was built on the site.

The period of emergence of the Jewish community is unknown. In 1897, there were 462 Jews living in Baryshivka (25% of the total population). From 1904 onwards, the rabbi in Baryshivka was Falk Shusterman. The Jewish population of the town decreased to 134 in 1939 (5% of the total population). In November 1941, the entire Jewish population of Baryshivka, numbering more than 100 people, were shot by Nazis. In 1999, there were 15 Jews living in Baryshivka.

Region: Kyiv
District: Baryshivka
Type And Height of Existing Fence: No fence
Gravestones: No tombstones preserved
Mass Graves on Site: No
Drone surveys: Yes
Fastiv Jewish Cemetery

Perimeter map:

Fastiv Jewish Cemetery map

The oldest known gravestone dates from 1906, and the last burial took place in 2008. During World War II, the Nazis removed gravestones from the cemetery for use as the foundation of the local Gestapo headquarters.

There were originally two Jewish cemeteries in Fastiv. The old cemetery stopped functioning in the 19th century and, after WWII, was earmarked for private construction by the local authorities. The exact location of this cemetery is unknown.

HISTORY OF THE JEWISH COMMUNITY: When exactly a Jewish community in Fastiv emerged is unknown. The town suffered during the Khmelnitsky uprising from 1648 to 1649, and the Jewish community of that time, if any, would have been destroyed. Jews from Fastiv are first mentioned in documents from 1700.  From 1772 to 1776, the mentor of the Fastiv community was Avraam Malakh, the son of Rabbi Dov Ber from Mezhirich. In 1782, Rabbi Israel Polotzker, one of Rabbi Dov Ber’s first students, was passing through Fastiv and died there. The Fastiv community suffered during the Haidamak pogroms in 1750, 1752 and 1768. The Jewish population of Fastiv numbered 2,694 in 1847 and had grown to 5,595 by 1897. In addition to the Jewish district within the city, the second Jewish area in Fastiv was the agricultural settlement of Kadlubitsa. Kadlubitsa suffered during the Denikin pogroms of 1918-19; after the pogroms; afterwards, the JDC helped the community to rebuild their houses. During collectivisation, the Jewish collective farm “Roiter Poyer” (Red Ploughman) was situated in Kadlubitsa. During the German occupation, most of the adult Jewish population of Fastiv was moved to Bila Tserkva; a special ghetto was constructed for children. The residents of the Kadlubitsa suburb were murdered in the forest on the outskirts of Fastiv, as was the population of the children’s ghetto and Jewish refugees from Zhytomyr. Some of their remains were reburied in the Jewish cemetery after the war. The Jewish community existed after the war; there were underground minyanim in the city and people collected money for community needs, including cemetery maintenance. In 1998, the Jewish community was re-registered.

Region: Kyiv
District: Fastiv
Type And Height of Existing Fence: Type of the fence
Gravestones: Yes
Traces of Vandalism: No
Drone surveys: Yes
Makariv Jewish Cemetery

Perimeter map:

Makariv Jewish Cemetery map

The Makariv Jewish cemetery already existed in the mid-19th century, when Menachem Nachum Twersky was buried there.  The cemetery was destroyed in 1970s, and some tombstones were transferred to the Makariv municipal cemetery. In last decades the ohel of Menachem Twersky of Makarov was reconstructed by  the organisation “Ohalei Tzaddikim.”

 

The Makariv Jewish community has existed since mid-18th century.  In 1765, it included 217 taxpayers. According to census data, the Jewish population consistently grew during the 19th century: from 848 in 1847, to 1,207 in 1864, and 3,953 in 1887. The Hasidic dynasty of Makariv, a branch of Chernobyl Hasidism, was founded in 1837. In 1867, there was one synagogue in Makariv, and by the end of the cenury, there were six. During the 19th cenury, the synagogue and the beit-midrash were rebuilt several times at the landowner’s expense, according to historian M. Pokhilevich, because of fires which destroyed the town. The Jewish community of Makariv suffered severely from the pogroms during the civil war. Makariv’s Jews were able to defend themselves against attacks on November 21, 1917, but on July 6 and August 15, 1919, 20 Jews were killed by gangs led by Sokolovsky and Matviyenko. By the time the Volunteer Army arrived, about 4,000 Jews had left Makariv, with around 200 elderly people remaining in town. Around 100 were killed in the pogrom on August 18, 1919. In 1920, the Jewish collective farm “Vozrozhdeniye” (“A revival”) was founded in Makariv, counting 141 members by 1930. After the Nazi occupation in late July 1941, the first shooting of Jewish population in the Kyiv region took place in Makariv. The total number of Makariv Jews killed during the Holocaust was around 250. In 1999, about 20 Jews lived in Makariv.

Region: Kyiv
District: Makariv
Type And Height of Existing Fence: No fence
Gravestones: No tombstones preserved
Traces of Vandalism: No
Mass Graves on Site: No
Drone surveys: No
Rozhiv New Jewish Cemetery

Current and historical cemetery perimeters:

Rozhiv New Jewish Cemetery maps

The Rozhiv New Jewish cemetery appears on a Red Army map from the 1930s. It was supposedly demolished during or after WWII.

There is not much information on the Rozhiv Jewish community. Presumably, Jews had settled there in the18th century. In 1787, 25 Jews were registered in Rozhiv. In 1847, there were already 257 Jews in the town. In 1850, the Jewish agricultural colony “Rozhivskaya” was founded, with 88 male members. In 1897, the community consisted of 610 Jews (29.5% of the total population).  On July 3, 1919, a pogrom took place in the town, though some of the Jewish population managed to flee before. In 1926, only 19 Jews remained in Rozhiv. The Jews still living here during the Nazi occupation were murdered together with the Jews of neighbouring villages. There was no Jewish community in Rozhiv after Holocaust.

Region: Kyiv
District: Makariv
Type And Height of Existing Fence: No fence
Gravestones: No tombstones preserved
Traces of Vandalism: No
Mass Graves on Site: No
Drone surveys: No
Rozhiv Old Jewish Cemetery

Current and historical cemetery perimeters:

Rozhiv Old Jewish Cemetery maps

The Rozhiv Old Jewish cemetery appears on Red Army maps from the 1930s.  The last burials presumably took place in the early 20th century. The date of the cemetery’s demolition is unknown. According to local residents, the tombstones were already removed from the cemetery in the 1950s.  The construction of a residential building on the cemetery site in the mid-1980s excavated human bones. According to the mayor of Rozhiv, some tombstones from this cemetery have been preserved until today. The search for them is ongoing.

There is not much information on the Rozhiv Jewish community. Presumably, Jews had settled there in the18th century. In 1787, 25 Jews were registered in Rozhiv. In 1847, there were already 257 Jews in the town. In 1850, the Jewish agricultural colony “Rozhivskaya” was founded, with 88 male members. In 1897, the community consisted of 610 Jews (29.5% of the total population).  On July 3, 1919, a pogrom took place in the town, though some of the Jewish population managed to flee before. In 1926, only 19 Jews remained in Rozhiv. The Jews still living here during the Nazi occupation were murdered together with the Jews of neighbouring villages. There was no Jewish community in Rozhiv after Holocaust.

Region: Kyiv
District: Makariv
Type And Height of Existing Fence: No fence
Gravestones: No tombstones preserved
Traces of Vandalism: No
Mass Graves on Site: No
Drone surveys: No