Zychlin Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Poland
Region
Łódzkie Voivodeship
District
Kutno
Settlement
Żychlin
Site address
The entrance to the cemetery is next to 57A, Łukasiewicza Street.
GPS coordinates
52.2450927, 19.6351433
Perimeter length
478 meters
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
There is a metal fence about 1.7m high.
Preservation condition
Fenced and protected Jewish cemetery
General site condition
The entrance to the cemetery is via a dirt road next to 57A, Łukasiewicza Street. The cemetery is fenced, very overgrown. At the entrance there are 3 lapidariumuri with fragments of matzevot. In the background there is the tombstone of tzadik Szmuel Aby from Żychlin. The rest of the cemetery is unreachable due to the overgrown vegetation. There is an unmarked mass grave of Jews who were killed by the germans during the liquidation of the ghetto.
Number of existing gravestones
46. There are fragments of matzevot in the lapidarium.
Date of oldest tombstone
N/A
Date of newest tombstone
N/A
Urgency of erecting a fence
Low
Land ownership
Other
Preserved construction on site
There are several lapidariumuri of the preserved tombstones.
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

The Jewish cemetery in Żychlin is located about 600 metres east of the town centre, 90 metres north of Łukasińskiego Street, and covers a square plot of land, with an area of approximately 1.46 hectares. The cemetery was likely established in the mid-18th century at the same time the kehilla (organized Jewish community) was established. In 1929, in the official List of Cemeteries, the following was stated in the case of the Żychlin Jewish cemetery: “fenced, in good condition”. During World War II, the cemetery was used for carrying out executions. In March 1942, about 160 Jews were shot there, and,another 200 forced labourers were murdered there in the fall of 1942. The cemetery fell into disrepair during the war. The Germans used some matzevot for construction work in the city. Local residents in Żychlin also stole tombstones. The cemetery was then used as a pasture.

On September 25, 1965, the Presidium of the Municipal National Council in Żychlin adopted a resolution to close the cemetery. The ordinance was signed by the Minister of Municipal Economy on March 22, 1966. In 1992, thanks to the efforts of Mosze Zyslender, lapidaries with parts of recovered tombstones were built and a monument was unveiled on the grave of the Holocaust victims. A few years ago, at the initiative of Izrael Meir Gabaj, a tombstone was erected to commemorate tzadik Szmuel Aba from Żychlin, who died in 1879. The cemetery is surrounded by a metal mesh fence with an iron gate. The entrance is not closed. Litter and dense vegetation (including blackthorns) make it difficult to move around the cemetery. The owner of the cemetery is the Foundation for the Preservation of Jewish Heritage.

The first records of Jews in Żychlin date to the beginning of the 18th century. In 1921, 2,701 Jews lived in the town (39.5% of the population), most of whom were killed in 1942 by the Germans in Chełmno near the Ner River.