Svalyava Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Zakarpattia
District
Svalyava
Settlement
Svalyava
Site address
To reach the cemetery, turn onto the dirt road on the crossroads of Pershotravneva and Starolyubovlyans’ka streets. Proceed for 300 meters up to a concrete fence. The cemetery is located on the left of the road. Enter the site through the keeper’s lodge.
GPS coordinates
48.53946, 22.99789
Perimeter length
251 meters
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
The cemetery is surrounded by an old concrete fence of 1.5 metres height.
Preservation condition
Fenced and protected Jewish cemetery
General site condition
Completely enclosed by a concrete fence, well maintained.
Number of existing gravestones
600
Date of oldest tombstone
1805
Date of newest tombstone
2007
Urgency of erecting a fence
Fence is not needed
Land ownership
Property of local community
Preserved construction on site
Drone surveys
No

Historical overview

Presumably, the Jewish Cemetery in Svalyava was established in the late 18th century. The oldest preserved gravestone relates to 1805 and the latest one to 2007.

The first Jews arrived in the area of Svalyava in the 18th century. By 1830, 45 Jews settled in the village. In 1880, the Jewish population had increased to 319 (19,17% of the total population). By 1921, during the Czechoslovakian period, the Jewish population had increased to 1099. Jews were involved in the day-to-day life of Svalyava: 60 were tradesmen, 26 were artisans, few Jews were doctors, and one was a pharmacist. Jews owned seven factories and a bank. In March 1939, the Hungarian forces occupied the town, and the Jews were persecuted and forced out of their occupations. In 1940, 150 Jews were drafted into forced labour battalions. 1423 Jews were living in Svalyava in 1941 (16,9% of the total population). In August 1941 some Jews without Hungarian citizenship were expelled to German-occupied Kamyanets’-Podils’kyy and shot there. About 1000 remaining Jews of Svalyava were deported to Auschwitz on May 22, 1944. No Jews live in the town today.

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