Snovs’k Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Chernihiv
District
Snovsk
Settlement
Snovs'k
Site address
Snovs'k Jewish Cemetery
GPS coordinates
51.81649,31.985
Perimeter length
519 metres
Is the cemetery demolished
yes
Type and height of existing fence
Type of the fence
Preservation condition
Fenced and protected Jewish cemetery
General site condition
Unfenced Jewish cemetery. The cemetery is located in the woods, and is somewhat overgrown with bushes. However, the grounds are mostly well-maintained. Some of the older gravestones are partially sunken in the ground. There are a number of broken brick tombstones, but this appears to have been the result of natural degradation over time.
Number of existing gravestones
About 350
Date of oldest tombstone
1920
Date of newest tombstone
2016
Urgency of erecting a fence
High
Land ownership
State
Preserved construction on site
There is a cenotaph on the site dedicated to the gravestones demolished during the war. One of the stones was dated to 1904.
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

The exact period of the cemetery’s establishment is unknown. The oldest tombstone dates to the first half of the 20th century, so it can be inferred that the cemetery was founded in that era. It can first be found marked on a Russian map of the region from 1907.
The village of Korzhivka was established in the 1860s. It was renamed to Snovs’k at the end of 19th century. The earliest known Jewish community was established at the end of the 19th century. Jews were given permission to settle down in 1882. The village was home to Jewish owned drugstores, grocery stores, a metal trade, a haberdashery, a timber store, and a draper’s shop. In the early 1900s, the rabbi was Shneur-Zalman Gorelik (1880-1984). Before the revolution, the Jewish population of Snovs’k was estimated at about 1,000. During the Second World War, many Jewish families were able to evacuate. The city was occupied on September 3rd, 1941. In November 4th, 1941, 38 adult men were arrested and shot. The arrests continued throughout December and January. All of those arrested were killed in Chernihiv. In January 1942 the remainder of the Jewish population was shot in the forest outside the city. After the War the remains of the Jews killed in Snovs’k and Snovs’k county were relocated to this cemetery. A monument was erected in their memory. The Jewish community was reestablished in the 1990s. The first Head of community was local journalist Mark Spektorov (who emigrated to Israel). After his emigration. the position was occupied by Mark Lustikman. In 2006, Marina Abramovna Pismennaya became the Head of community. The town has an estimated population of 11,471 (as of 2013). Natan Grigoryevich Rakhlin, Ukrainian conductor, was born in Snovs’k in 1906. Chaim-Shaul Bruk, a famous Rabbi, was born in Snovs’k in 1894. He studied at the “Tomhey-Tmimim” yeshiva (Lubavitch). In 1928-29 he led a illegal Lubavitch yeshiva in Novograd-Volynskiy. Yehuda Slutsky, historian and writer, was born in Snovs’k in 1915. The exact period of the cemetery’s establishment is unknown. Given the oldest preserved tombstone dates to the first half of the 20th century, it can be inferred the cemetery was founded in that era. It can first be found marked on a Russian map of the region from 1907.