Pavoloch New Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Zhytomyr
District
Popelnyansky
Settlement
Pavoloch
Site address
Entrance to the cemetery to the right of the house on the street. No.97 Zavala street.
GPS coordinates
49.87532, 29.45361
Perimeter length
475 мetres
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
The cemetery is not fenced, apparently it was fenced at one point and the ditch remains.
Preservation condition
Unfenced Jewish cemetery
General site condition
Part of the cemetery, which is located on a private territory, is used for grazing. Tombstones have been broken. The part of the cemetery which is located in woodland, is overgrown. It needs clearing. A part of the cemetery which is located on private territory, is used for grazing livestock. The first burials began in 1941. According to the owner, the house was built in 1952. The mistress of the house does not like that there are tombstones and an Ohel in her yard.
Number of existing gravestones
There are about 100 gravestones. Cemetery is not used for burying.
Date of oldest tombstone
1912 (the earliest tombstone found by ESJF).
Date of newest tombstone
1941 (the latest tombstone found by ESJF).
Urgency of erecting a fence
High
Land ownership
Municipality
Preserved construction on site
There is Ohel, it stands on private territory.
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

A part of the cemetery which is located on private territory, is used for grazing livestock. The first burials began in 1941. According to the owner, the house was built in 1952. The mistress of the house does not like that there are tombstones and an Ohel in her yard.

Jews first began to settle in Pavoloch (Ukr. Паволоч, Rus. Паволочь, Yid. פּאָוואָלאָטש) in the 17th century. The community was devastated during the Chmielnicki uprising of 1648–49, and there were only 3 Jews in Pavoloch in 1683, the town’s population at this point was only 42 people. In 1736, 35 Jews were killed in the Haidamak revolt. In 1753, 13 Jews from the area, including the rabbi of Pavoloch R. Akiva, were executed in a blood libel. The Jewish population grew from 103 in 1765, (including neighbouring smaller settlements) to 2,113 in 1847, and reached 3,391Jewish residents, which was 37% of the town in 1897. The Jewish community maintained a synagogue and several prayer houses, a cemetery and a loan fund. There was a considerable emigration to the USA, and the First Pavolocher Sick Benevolent Association was founded in New York in 1908. The community survived several pogroms during the Civil War of 1918–21. The Jewish population declined in the interwar period and had fallen to 630 Jewish residents (11%) in 1939. After the German invasion in 1941, many of the local Jews managed to flee the advancing German troops.
It is not known exactly when the cemetery was founded. The oldest tombstone dates back to 1912. The cemetery became disused after the destruction of the Jewish community during WWII.

View 3D model