Novi Velidnyky Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Zhytomyr
District
Ovruch
Settlement
Novi Velidnyky
Site address
The cemetery is located at the north-western exit from the village of Novi Velidniki, on the road to the village of Slovechnoye, on the left hand side of the road.
GPS coordinates
51.31812, 28.45779
Perimeter length
523 мetres
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
The cemetery is only fenced at the front and on the sides. The front side has a concrete fence 1.2m high and the sides are mesh fences. The fence at the rear has been destroyed.
Preservation condition
Fenced and protected Jewish cemetery
General site condition
The area closest to the front of the cemetery is well looked after, deeper into the cemetery the area is covered with dense seasonal vegetation.
Number of existing gravestones
There are about 30 gravestones.
Date of oldest tombstone
1840 (the earliest tombstone found by ESJF).
Date of newest tombstone
1953 (the latest tombstone found by ESJF).
Urgency of erecting a fence
Low
Land ownership
Municipality
Preserved construction on site
There is an Ohel dedicated to R. Israel Dov Bera.
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

According to the Commission on the Preservation of Jewish Heritage, it was founded in the early 19th century. The earliest preserved tombstone dates to 1840, which corroborates this. The cemetery is marked on maps from the late 19th-early 20th century.

Novi Velidnyky (Ukr. (Нові) Велідники, Rus. (Новые) Веледники, Yid. וולעדניק) had an organised Jewish community in the 18th century. In 1757, Jewish tailors and furriers were granted the right to establish a guild partly independent of the kahal and were allowed to have a separate prayer house. The Jewish population grew from 152 in 1765, to 621 in 1847, and reached 569 (50% of the town) in 1897. The Jewish community maintained 2 prayer houses. A pogrom occured in December 1917 and in the interwar period, the Jewish population declined to around 400 people.
The Jews who had failed to flee the advancing German army were murdered in the autumn of 1941.

The cemetery was likely established in the early 19th century. The oldest tombstone dates to 1840. There is an ohel over the grave of R. Israel Dov Ber, which was recently built.