Janow Lubelski New Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Poland
Region
Lublin Voivodeship
District
Janów
Settlement
Janów Lubelski
Site address
The cemetery is located at the intersection of Wojska Polskiego and Objazdowa Streets.
GPS coordinates
50.69805, 22.42495
Perimeter length
495,88 metres
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
No fence
Preservation condition
Unfenced Jewish cemetery
General site condition
It is a severely damaged Jewish Cemetery, overgrown with woods and litter was found at the site. One matzevah have been preserved. On the street side there are signs informing about the cemetery.
Number of existing gravestones
There is 1 damaged, overturned matzevah.
Date of oldest tombstone
N/A
Date of newest tombstone
N/A
Urgency of erecting a fence
High
Land ownership
State
Preserved construction on site
No
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

In 1825 a plot of land for the new Jewish cemetery in Janów Lubelski was acquired, and the first burials took place the following year. The cemetery was located about 1.4 km to the southeast of the market square. Originally, it covered an area of 1 morga (about 0.6 hectares (ha)) and was enclosed with a wooden fence. A small building (the purpose of which is unknown) was erected there as well. In 1915, 10 Jewish soldiers from the Austro-Hungarian army were buried there. The cemetery was expanded over the years and, in the interwar period, it was shaped like an elongated rectangle, covered an area of 1.47 ha, and was enclosed with a stone wall. The cemetery was seriously damaged during World War II. In 1942, the Germans murdered about 300 Jews in the cemetery, and murdered several dozen more by 1944. The bodies were buried in unmarked mass graves which have not been located. After the war, the cemetery further degraded. The ruins of the wall were torn down and the remains of matzevot were taken away. In 1971, the area was planted with pine trees. The area of the cemetery has since been partially preserved. The lower part of the wall and the bases of a few matzevot remain.