Dashiv Old Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Vinnytsia
District
Ilinetsky
Settlement
Dashiv
Site address
When leaving Dashiv, drive 1.1 kilometres in the direction of Kytayhorod, at which point the cemetery should be located in the woods to the left.
GPS coordinates
48.98718, 29.46435
Perimeter length
304 мetres
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
The cemetery is unfenced, but a ditch is clearly visible around its perimeter.
Preservation condition
Unfenced Jewish cemetery
General site condition
The cemetery is severely overgrown, and some trees have fallen on the tombstones.
Number of existing gravestones
Approximately 10 stones. Ruined stones without inscriptions were found on the site.
Date of oldest tombstone
N/A
Date of newest tombstone
N/A
Urgency of erecting a fence
High
Land ownership
State
Preserved construction on site
No
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

According to the Commission on the Preservation of Jewish Heritage, the cemetery was established in the first half of the 19th century. The Kytayhorod Jewish community also used the cemetery. It cannot be found marked on old maps of the region.

The earliest evidence of a Jewish community in Dashiv dates to the 18th century. According to the census of 1765, there lived 406 Jews in the town. The Jewish population had fallen by half in 1776 to just 270 people. According to the census of 1847, the Jewish population numbered 1,837.
In 1865 there operated 3 synagogues. From 1885, the rabbi was Aryeh Yehuda-Leib Wacher (1860—?).
According to the census of 1897, it was home to 600 Jews, which was around 10% of the population.
Israel Wacher, a poet and prose writer, was born in 1892 in Dashiv
By 1909, there was a private boy’s school in the town and in 1912 a loan-saving partnership was in operation. In 1917 and 1919, the Jewish community suffered two severe pogroms.
In the 1920-1930 there was Jewish elementary school and by 1939, the Jewish population numbered 967 people (34.1%).
Dashiv was occupied on July 25th 1941. During the first days 100 Jews were executed.
In total, there were 814 Jews executed, including those from the surrounding areas.

According to Commission on the Preservation of Jewish Heritage, the cemetery was established in the first half of the 19th century. It could be found marked on the old Russian maps of the region as early as the 1900s. It is known that the Kytayhorod community also used the cemetery. Nowadays the cemetery is heavily overgrown. There are only around 10 stones without inscriptions left.

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