Nahirne Jewish Cemetery

Cemetery Information

Country
Ukraine
Region
Kirovohrad
District
Svitlovodsk
Settlement
Nahirne
Site address
From the settlement Podorozhne drive by the north-eastern departure on the north. After the road turns on the east, drive around 640 meters and turn left on the adjacent road. Then, in around 310 meters turn left on the dirt crossroad. Move around 366 meters and turn right, around the corner of the private house. Then, move around 60 meters and turn right - there will be the cleares entering on the territory of the site.
GPS coordinates
49.08236,33.09695
Perimeter length
389 metres
Is the cemetery demolished
no
Type and height of existing fence
Fenced by ESJF in September 2021.September 202
Preservation condition
Fenced and protected Jewish cemetery
General site condition
This is a fenced and well-maintained Jewish cemetery.
Number of existing gravestones
40. The territory of the site is overgrowth with high grass and bushes, so there is probably more gravestones could be found
Date of oldest tombstone
1904 (the earliest tombstone found by ESJF)
Date of newest tombstone
1958 (the latest tombstone found by ESJF)
Urgency of erecting a fence
Fence is not needed
Land ownership
Private
Preserved construction on site
No
Drone surveys
Yes

Historical overview

Nahirne (also known as Novogeorgievsk, Krylov, or Svetlovodsk which can refer to several neighbouring towns) was founded in 1615 and received the Magdeburg rights in 1616. In 1734 the region came under the rule of the Russian Empire, becoming a part of Novorossia, and from 1802 was a part to the Kherson Governorate (Khersonskaya gubernia). In 1860, the Jewish community numbered about 200 and maintained a synagogue in the town. By 1897, Jews accounted for 1,455 of the total population (11,594), and numbered 1,639 individuals by 1910. At this point, two synagogues and seven ḥeders (with 110 students) were operating.

In October 1905 a pogrom took place, though there were no casualties. After 1922, Nahirne became a part of Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic within the USSR. In the 1920’s-1930’s, the Jewish population numbered around 1500 (with some fluctuation). A Jewish scout unit was founded in 1922 and a Yiddish school was established in 1926. In 1941, some Jews fled to the East, but many remained behind. Nahirne was occupied by the Germans on August 7, 1941. In January 1942, about 470 Jews were shot to death. In 1991, after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Nahirne became a part of the independent Ukraine.

The Jewish cemetery has a few remaining headstones, is fenced, and overgrown.

Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery
Nahirne Jewish Cemetery